The fascist economy in Norway
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The fascist economy in Norway

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Published by Clarendon Press in Oxford .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Norway

Subjects:

  • Norway -- Economic policy,
  • Norway -- History -- German occupation, 1940-1945

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. [301]-309.

Statementby Alan S. Milward.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC365 .M54
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 317 p.
Number of Pages317
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5324823M
ISBN 100198214960
LC Control Number72177595

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